Wednesday, April 6, 2016

1914 Photos of West Carrollton and Miami Township and other farms by NEW







 Around 1914, p 45 of a NEW album, on the George Eicher farm Hill, now part of Cox Arboretum that was featured in one of their newsletters....woman in white, Paul Henry Weaver with his mom, Edna Eicher Weaver
 
On the same creek on the Eicher farm, woman and men with hat, and PHW and Edna on top of the log, with Emma Esther Eicher and Henry in front.  p46

 
p 50 and likely a big worker meal, likely at the Friend Paper Company around 1914 By NEW 
 West Carrollton Paper - Envelope Company with the village of West Carrollton CA 1914


 CA 1924 Weaver family farm, with Hattie and Noah #6-7 2nd row, PHW #1, about 1 miles west of Miamisburg
 Unknown family gathering p 52
Paul family Jefferson Twp p 52 L - R  Eliza Paul, John Paul, Helena "Lane"Paul Eicher, Mollie, Christina, Sarah and Amelia.   

 CA 1915 Friend Paper Co Office building where NEW worked as a clerk








Thursday, March 31, 2016

Noah Elwood Weaver Photos from Ohio CA1912 -3


  
1913 Henry Eicher, grandfather of Paul Henry Weaver (b 1910) and Ethyl Elizabeth Eicher (b March 1913) with grandma Helena "Lane" Paul Eicher, p 67 
____ ? Bailey (WWI era uniform) Cora E Weidner Peffly, Harley Peffly p 65, on bridge...Montgomery Co OHIO

  
Car by bridge, Buick? Cora Peffly, ______Bailey in uniform, Harley Peffly leaning on car - loose photo on NEW collection, CA 1913.  
p63 As suggested by my cousin Jeannette Allen Weaver this week in March 2016,of the Paul and Brandt lineage: she said this may be at the farm-barn of Levi Eshbaugh. She found him, as one of 4 of her Paul lineage, 1) the fellow with a moustache just to the left of a man's head at the middle post - this is Jeannette's grandfather, and 2) to the right of the man's head is a woman standing, in white,  her grandma, Sarah Paul Eshbaugh. Two women, in the lower right, on either side of a boy, standing behind the girl is white, Left is 3) Ida Eshbaugh (Jeannette's mom) and to the right 4) Jenny Shade (who later married Dan Isler) -  I date this about 1913, as Paul Henry Weaver, born in 1910 is the boy 5th from the left front row. His aunt Esther Eicher 2nd from L, 2nd row, and mom, Edna Eicher Weaver 4th from L in 3rd row.

From Noah Elwood Weaver's 1909 -1916 Black Album soon to be housed at Wright State University 
Morel Mushrooms spring 1913 p68....


 
1913 auto on back Ohio road, p 69  
 Noah Elwood Weaver with harvest of plants, 1913, p 69
Man with hat and child, walking beach on Lake Erie p 70. NEW

 1913 Six young women on front lawn of spacious home.   NEW p 70
 1913 Six young women, unnamed, with early car and steps at rock building.  P 70 NEW
Two children, 1913 playing on country road by fence.  NEW P 71 
Likely Twins Estle and Esburn Allen, per Jeannette Allen Weaver (April 2016)

  
p 71  Two children with woman on sandy country road with fence.  Estle and Esburn Allen NEW

p 71  Six young women, ____names?, at rock and wood structures, by NEW 1913, likely Montgomery Co OHIO



 p72  Three kids playing on the road,  NEW album

 
p72 Two kids on the road, 1913, no id, by NEW Ohio Twins Estle and Esburn Allen
 p73 Three men with guns "playing" outside farm house, NEW
 p 74 Child in big hat and ear of maize (corn) NEW
Man with cigar farm porch with 2 children in double pram.  David  Allen with Twins per Jeannette Allen Weaver (4.2016)

 Two kids playing in the sandy road p 75 with woman to the right NEW- Allen Twins
 Two Children on road p 75 with silhouette of car  Allen Twins




Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Findlay Glessner Travels to California 1921 and 1927





Peg Glessner Weaver, was gracious in publishing her detailed memoir, outlining different phases of her long life.  In Rememberings, she described her fathers love for California and the visits to relatives around the LA area on the maternal, Chappelear side of his family. 

Here she describes her journey, p 13 + "For my second trip to California, when I was in the fifth grade, my parents took me out of school. Again we took the Santa Fe from Chicago. The train became uncomfortably hot, but if we opened a window for air we might get cinders in our eyes. At Flagstaff; Arizona, our train car was switched off for a side-trip to the Grand Canyon. Because it was snowing hard, most of the day was spent in a small,  stone lookout building with a warm fire in a large fireplace and a wonderful view of the Canyon. Going through Arizona I had a glance at a large meteor crater as the train traversed its edge. On this, or our earlier trip, we got off the train to eat some of our meals at Fred Harvey Restaurants next to the train depot. (I suppose some trains lacked dining cars.)


In 1921, at age 10, here in Peg Glessner with her dad at one of the Santa Fe train stations in the spring of 1921. 
1921 Albuquerque Train station, selling of native wares . 
 Another news stand in the photo album 1921, with Harry C Glessner and Peg Glessner 

The Pearne's had once lived in Findlay and were friends of the Sr Glessners. Here is Anna "Tod?" with Irv and son John, with Harry C and Margaret Glessner p37 album

p13 "With my parents' friends, Iry and Stella Pearne and their son, John, we drove up into the mountains and the redwood trees to Big Bear for a picnic, eating beside a gurgling mountain stream, where John and I played at making a dam in the icy water. Easter weekend was spent in Riverside, in an elegant, old hotel, Mission Inn On Easter morning we joined in a procession of cars ascending Mt. Rubidoux in the dark to participate in a sunrise service."

In the mean time, in the mid 1920's the Glessner's built a new home at 204 Glendale Ave in Findlay. 


 
Front of 204 Glendale priro to landscaping.....
p 57  Front of 204 Glendale, Margaret and her dad, Harry C Glessner, CA 1927-28, Peg's Senior Year in High School 

At the end of my junior year in high school (1927) I made my last trip to California when we drove in our Buick sedan, equipped with extra gasoline in a large can on the running board.


Bob Alge, my current beau, gave me a box of rich, Gilbert's Panama Chocolates as a parting gift. 

 
 L - R page 60, Bob Alge, Peg Glessner, Helen Mann, and ?
Using Blue Book cards (about 5x10 inches) which we had obtained from the American Automobile Association, we followed the Santa Fe Trail, which frequently paralleled the Santa Fe Railroad. Because roads lacked signs with route numbers, each card included a small map with explicit directions to the next town, such as the number of miles to the next railroad track and, in town, the number of blocks to the next turn. "Blow your Claxon" signs appeared before sharp curves or one-way bridges. Claxon was a brand of automobile horn.  Arriving in St. Louis the day when Lindberg landed in Paris after his solo flight across the Atlantic, the big pipe organ at the movie theater played "Lucky Lindy" and we all sang:
Lucky Lindy up in the sky, Lucky Lindy flying so high.
Our route then took us to Columbia and Kansas City in Missouri, Wichita, Emporia and Lawrence into en Kansas. In Lawrence we visited relatives affiliated with the University. The farther west, the worse the roads became. Many were not paved, though often in the process, making long detours rather common on narrow, bumpy roads. We drove into the beautiful mountains, through Trinidad in Colorado, Raton Pass, La Junta, Santa Fe, and Gallop in New Mexico. In the hot desert we encountered a sandstorm making it necessary to drive with the windows closed. There was no air-conditioning.
An interesting side trip to the Isleta American Indian Ruins in New Mexico took us on a narrow road fording dry stream beds. At the Petrified Forest in Arizona, we acquired a polished sample of vividly colored, striated agate, and at the Painted Desert bought a small glass vial containing strata of the many colored sands.
At the Grand Canyon we had reservations at the old, famous, historic El Tovar Hotel. Since we were there on my birthday, to celebrate, my mother and I rode horseback with a guide. I had never ridden anything but a Shetland pony; my mother had ridden horses on the farm, many, many years before. We were stiff and sore for the bumpy detours the next day.

 

 
Peg Glessner at the wheel with Harry C as passenger 

 
 At the Grand Canyon we had reservations at the old, famous, historic El Tovar Hotel. Since we were there on my birthday, to celebrate, my mother and I rode horseback with a guide. I had never ridden anything but a Shetland pony; my mother had ridden horses on the farm, many, many years before. We were stiff and sore for the bumpy detours the next day.  June 3, 1927
 Pearne Famiy Irv, Alan, Anna, Inez and Peg Glessner with John Pearne




Peg Glessner and John Pearne 
  
Buick and Joshua tree. 


Sunday, March 27, 2016

Glessner Famiy Roots 1910-20 in Findlay Ohio, Donnell Birthday Parties, Golf, Frances Owen's Sheltand Pony, Robert and John Glessner cousins - Margaret Mary Glessner Weaver storytelling with photos

Margaret "Peg" Glessner with her father, Harry C Glessner, golf club likely at Findlay Country Club where HG Glessner his father LC Glessner played a lot of "ball golf"  - the small golf bag reminds me of the two bags I have that my mom inherited from her Glessner family....

Here is an over view that might be interesting to archive somewhere. (just took a photo of mashies and niblicks on my porch here on Easter) any interest in finding a home for them?

Any suggestions to market them?
Two vintage bags, 17 irons wood and metal shafted and 8 woods, all used in early 20th Century, by Harry C Glessner and his sister Mary E Glessner.


Margaret Glessner, Born in Findlay OH, June 3, 2010, left her parents photo album from about 1900 to her college days at Oberlin College in the late 1920's with me  I continue to post photos to celebrate history and connections for the next generations. According to Inez Chase in her wedding book, here is where she and Harry C Glessner lived in Findlay. After their wedding in March 1908 "
Lived at 1028 S Main while mother Glessner and Dad went to California.  THen lived at
627 West Sandusky St. In June 1910 move to 122 Howard St, Dec 1910, 
moved to 1201 S Main St 627 West Sandusky St. In june 1910 move to 122 Howard St, 
Dec 1910, moved to 1201 S Main St.
Built bungalow at 1228 S Main St and moved in Nov 1911.
Built house at 204 Glendale Ave and Moved there in Feb 1925


Page 1,  Inez Chase Glessner with Margaret Mary 'Peg' Glessner CA 1918
I continue to be inspired by the celebration of life and storytelling of Peg Weaver, who models for me, "How to die young as late in life as possible"   When I go for a walk, like I did this morning, I see the awakening of spring, the fungi, the birds, this morning robins and red wing blackbirds, and then celebrating the family tree that I am part of.  The Glessners, in German, Glassmacher, who arrived in Pennsylvania and then migrated into Ohio - Lewis Glessner, being born in Somerset PA, then to Columbiana Co OH, and then to Findlay as a newpaper man.


Here is the bungalow that Harry and Inez built on 1228 S Main in Findlay with Peg in the front around 1918.
 
Peg Glessner in snow in front of the bungalow...1228 S Main.


1920 CA p 18 Frances Owen driving her pony with Margaret Glessner aside, Dode and David Davis in back. from Rememberings "My best friend, Frances Owen, lived kitty-cornered across the street from me in a b-i-g red, brick house with her parents, Minnie and Frank Owen, a maid, and a yard-man-chauffeur housed above the garage. Mr. Owen was president of Electric Porcelain Products. Their house had a porte cochere, a roofed entrance adjoining the driveway where their car could be driven, allowing people to get in without getting wet when it rained. Frances had a Shetland pony with a cart. When I rode the pony, my feet almost touhed the pavement. While Frances was away, I took care of her pony and rode it to my house from the livery stable downtown. One day the reins broke. To get the pony back to the stable, I walked feeding it sugar lumps the whole way so it would follow me. For a very short time Frances and I had pet rabbits after we had found a nest of babies. Their yardman built us a pen, but the mesh of the wire was too large, (intentionally so?) letting them escape. Those were the only pets I ever had. I would bring home small, cuddly kittens, but my mother wouldn't let me keep them. "They have germs," she would always say."


 
 
 The First of three Donnell parties bound in the photo album, this one on p 13, likely at this during WW I with all the flags......from Peg's memoir p10  "The Donnells, Ohio Oil people who became Marathon Oil people, had BIG birthday parties for their three boys, Jim, John and Dewey, with long tables spread out across the lawn. Fancy, paper hats, cute favors, balloons, and a photographer to take pictures were highlights I don't know why I was invited. Maybe it was because I was a Presbyterian, too."





Second  of  of three birthday parties at the Donnell family home. page 19 CA 1919 Peg is looking at the camera, 4th on the left.


 Last of the 3 Donnell parties in the album.  P 20 around 1920.   I think Peg is the 6th from the left, back row, with her mouth open :-)
Parade at the end of WWI, Elks Building in Downtown Findlay with a marching band. Perhaps this is the day when Gen Pershing was in town? :-) p11 of Rememberings "When General Black-Jack Pershing was at a reception at the Findlay Elks Club after the war, I was thrilled to shake the hand of the war hero who led American troops in Europe. His handsome son accompanied him, which was exciting for us grade school girls."

Parade in 1918 in Findlay, with "Aviation" Theme,  frame of airplane over a car. p 5
 MGW, Peg Glessner age 8 on page 5, with parasol.
Cousins Robert Glessner, left with Peg Glessner, and John L Glessner on right, Cedar Point, Lake Erie.  From Rememberings by Peg "When I was in high school I had my first paying job working at the Glessner Company in the summer for 250 cents an hour.    Twenty-five cents could buy a lot in the 1920's. F. W. Woolworth 50 & 100 Stores had an amazing selection. At my job I used the adding machine to tot up various items (The adding machine was not electric, but operated by a hand lever.), kept inventory and put small, round-headed, colored tacks in maps to show salesmen's routes. My father had governors installed on the salesmen's cars to insure that they wouldn't exceed the speed limit. Several times our family drove to Cedar Point, Ohio,where my father and Uncle Lewis attended a convention for druggists. Our route took us through Sandusky, Ohio, then onto a concrete road through the sand out along the shore of Lake Erie. We stayed at a big, resort hotel where Uncle Lewis, Aunt Peach, my cousins, Bob and John stayed, too. Swimming was fun in the waves, wearing bathing suits with short sleeves and short, straight skirts reaching almost to our knees. Women put on thin, rubber bathing caps with little ruffles around the edge. The roller coaster looked like a good time, but one ride was enough for me, making me very queasy. Much more enjoyable was the Crazy House, with its mirrors that made me look funny, and a very large, rotating, flat disc (like a large Victorola record) which spun me off rather gently. My father took chances at a booth and won a Kewpie for me, a small chubby doll with a topknot of hair.

John L Glessner, son of Uncle Lewis Glessner to Peg. Peg Glessner with snow ball shrub - Both born in June 1910.  Peg from Rememberings "My Uncle Lewis and Aunt Peach, who lived about a block from us, had two sons, John, my age, and Bob, who was older. With some neighbor-boys, Bob and John built a strange contraption with two barrels and some two by fours - a "two-barrel Ferris wheel", each barrel rotating at the end of two long two-by fours. Small passengers stood in the barrels and had an exciting ride. One Saturday afternoon John, a towhead, and I, a red head, had an adventure, a long tricycle ride, he pedaling and I standing on the step behind. From our homes on South Main Street, we traveled to the Glessner Company, a good mile's journey, to see our fathers, forgetting that it was Saturday afternoon, that the factory would be closed. We triked on, onto the bridge across the Blanchard River, getting off to hang over the railing, looking at the water many feet below. Our plan had been to go to Riverside Park at least another two miles ahead, but we were tired, turned around and went home. We had been missed! We were punished!"

Her cousins Bob and John moved away suddenly page 3 Rememberings " Uncle Lewis and his family moved from Findlay to California when I was in grade school. My father said that Uncle Lewis had taken some petty cash and stamps from the Glessner Company, sometimes frequented pool rooms and gambled. All this displeased my grandfather, who, as the President of the company, fired him. That was the side of the story I knew. Of course I knew no other. My Aunt Mary was very sympathetic to Uncle Lewis's family, remembering them well in her will. This made my father fume, since she left him only $1,000 which he refused to accept. He thought that he deserved more since, after their father's death, he created a job for her with a desk in the main office and put up with her late arrivals and unsatisfactory performance of her duties."



"
Construction in 1924 of the new home for Harry C, Inez and Margaret Glessner on 204 Glendale Ave in Findlay.   Here is what Peg wrote in her memoir p 18-9

"My parents had a wonderful offer to sell our little bungalow, receiving a lot in trade, 204 Glendale
Avenue. While our new home was being built, we rented a house on Elm Street, across from my good friends, Sarah Hartman (Jones), Frances Crosby (Schott) and Mary Ellen Davis (Wagner) (See picture #4, p. 13t.). What fun we had walking to high school together. On rainy days we donned yellow oil- cloth slickers, which were as stiff as boards in cold weather -- and which our friends autographed with indelible pencils. My friends called me "Peg", but my mother and father were forever stuck with "Margaret". Sarah's parents were Zoe and John Hartman, a physician; Frances's, Nellie and George Crosby, owner of a shoe store, where Frances and I had fun trying on the stock; Mary Ellen's, Mae and Guy Davis, the Hancock County Treasurer.........
The excavation for our new house at 204 Glendale Avenue was not done with a backhoe, but with a team of horses pulling a huge scoop to haul out the dirt. Finding house plans in a book, an English Tudor style with half timbers and stucco. (See picture #3, p. 134e) We found the house plans in a book and didn't use an architect. Variegated tile, like that on the roof, was the vestibule's floor and paving for the curved walk from the front door. A step down into the living room from the front hall turned out to be a bug-a-boo for my mother, since she felt that she had to caution all new comers, fearing they might not see the step and fall. With windows covering two of its walls, the sun room was the most lived-in room. A dining room, kitchen with a breakfast nook, and lavatory completed the downstairs. An attached garage was accessible from the kitchen.
Upstairs were three bedrooms and a bath. (A second bathroom was added after I left home.) My mother had a "safety door" installed to close off my parent's, my bedroom and the bath, because she was really frightened if my father wasn't home at night, which was seldom, going upstairs, taking me with her, then locking her safety door. Lightning storms also frightened her. When they occurred at night she would waken me and drag me down stairs with her. I don't recall if my father accompanied us. We moved into our new house when I was a high school sophomore."



ca 1918 Glessner Home 1228 S Main St, Findlay Ohio, with the family Oakland car.  Peg Weaver wrote in her memoir - page 18 +
"HIGH SCHOOL YEARS My parents had a wonderful offer to sell our little bungalow, receiving a lot in trade, 204 Glendale Avenue. While our new home was being built, we rented a house on Elm Street, across from my good friends, Sarah Hartman (Jones), Frances Crosby (Schott) and Mary Ellen Davis (Wagner) (See picture #4, p. 13t.). What fun we had walking to high school together. On rainy days we donned yellow oil- cloth slickers, which were as stiff as boards in cold weather -- and which our friends autographed with indelible pencils. My friends called me "Peg", but my mother and father were forever stuck with "Margaret". Sarah's parents were Zoe and John Hartman, a physician; Frances's, Nellie and George Crosby, owner of a shoe store, where Frances and I had fun trying on the stock; Mary Ellen's, Mae and Guy Davis, the Hancock County Treasurer.
Frances Crosby and I were excited about going to a Bible Camp on Lake Geneva in distant Wisconsin. outside of Chicago. After our parents deposited us there, we soon discovered that we were expected to study a lot, learning that this camp wasn't all fun and games. Homesickness set in, so we spent our free time sitting by the lakeside sobbing and eating Hershey bars. Watching yachts on the lake and a trip to Yerkes Observatory offered some relief. Finally the camp period was over and our parents rescued    us. The first night that we were back in civilization, we went to a movie in Chicago, where we became uncontrollably giggly while waiting in the theater lobby, embarrassing our parents so that they wished they had never seen us.
For my sixteenth birthday I received a key to our car, an Oakland coupe. Drivers' training hadn't been invented and there was no driver's license, no test given for permission to drive a car. Later we had a Hudson sedan, then a Buick. (See picture #2, p. 1310 Before purchasing a new car, we tested it to    see if it would knock when driving up Bigelow Hill, really only a small rise    at the north edge of town. We continued to have Buicks and my father looked quite impressive, or funny, driving his Buick while wearing a derby hat.